Thursday, August 27, 2015

Hopkins Demonstration Forest

Date of Visit: July 17, 2015 
Type of event: Field trip 
Organization: Hopkins Demonstration Forest
Location: Oregon City, Oregon
Hosts: Peter Matzca/ Hopkins Forest Educator
International Fellows: Sarita Lama (Nepal), Miguel Sanchez (Bolivia), Robert Mijol (Malaysia), Stuty Maskey (Nepal), Qingxin Liu (China)
WFI Staff: Shadia Duery / International Fellowship Manager, Dona Ye / Intern from China

This day we went on a tour of a demonstration forest located in the outskirts of Portland. This 140 acres of forest tries to mimic the decisions that small forest land owners have to make to have a financially sustainable operation.

We observed different management practices side to side: even age, uneven age, thinning.
We learned that:
  • Thinning can expose forests to abiotic damage.
  • Abiotic factors can be the most damaging to a forest, i.a. snow can snap tops, freeze can kill trees, and wind.
  • Stand Density Index (SDI) is the relationship of the sizes of the trees and the amount of trees per area, this relationship helps identify when is the optimal time for thinning to reduce density, and tree competition. 
  • Alder and Pine like wet places and are good for root rot replacement species.
  • Ponderosa Pine has a more fire resistant bark than other species.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

MC Ranch

Date of Visit: June 22-26, 2015 
Type of event: Field trip
Organization: MC Ranch
Location: Eastern, Oregon
Hosts: Rex Christensen/ MC Ranch Forest Farm Manager
International Fellows: Sarita Lama (Nepal), Miguel Sanchez (Bolivia), Robert Mijol (Malaysia), Stuty Maskey (Nepal), Qingxin Liu (China)
WFI Staff: Shadia Duery / International Fellowship Manager, Rick Zenn / Senior Fellow, Dona Ye / Intern from China

Every year the fellows go on a 5 day learning adventure to MC Ranch in Eastern Oregon. The main goal of the trip is to learn how to manage natural resources in a dry ecosystem. Fellows learn by observing the practices done by an actual ranch manager (Mr. Rex Christensen).


Day 1
We began our adventure by driving from the western to the eastern side of the Oregon Cascade Mountains all the way to the Blue Mountains. MC Ranch is located on the outskirts of La Grand Oregon. A beautiful wood barn right next to a river lodged us during our stay.

Driving through The Gorge we got a taste of the bountiful cherry and peach production of this year.


Little Beaver Creek Tree Farm Visit

Date of Visit: June 10, 2015 
Type of event: Field trip
Topic: Little Beaver Creek Tree Farm
Organization: Doneen Inc.
Location: Forest Grove, Oregon
Hosts: Anne and Richard Handschu
International Fellows: Sarita Lama (Nepal), Miguel Sanchez (Bolivia), Robert Mijol (Malaysia), Stuty Maskey (Nepal)
WFI Staff: Shadia Duery / International Fellowship Manager, Chandalin Bennett / Program Manager, Dona Ye / Intern from China

Anne and Richard have been tree farmers for many years and have a 280 acres of forests divided in three properties just an hour outside of Portland. They actively manage their tree farm and recently completed thinning and harvesting activities on part of their farm. They also use their farm to share with people about the lessons that they have learn while managing it. They walked us through their operations, talked about what it’s like to be a family that owns and operates a tree farm, and showed us the work they’ve done on their property thus far.

They manage their land under the following guidelines:
  • Keep multiple age stands. Currently (13% age 1-20, 36% age 21-40, 3% age 41-60, 46% age 61-80)
  • Small patch clear cuts (6-10 acres)
  • FSC certified as a group (to access markets)
  • Manage their harvest to reinvest in property improvements; like road improvement for fire protection and year round accessibility to the stands
  • Practice cable logging, land falling, and shovel logging
  • Practice weather logging (logging in the wet season) to get more money from mills when there is less wood in the market

Friday, August 14, 2015

Portland Water Bureau

Date of Visit: July 18, Aug 14 2015 
Type of event: Field trips
Organization:Portland Water Bureau
Location: Bull Run, Oregon; Columbia Slough, Oregon
Hosts: Lisa Vieno and Doug Wise / Water Bureau Resource Protection and Planning Group
International Fellows: Sarita Lama (Nepal), Miguel Sanchez (Bolivia), Robert Mijol (Malaysia), Stuty Maskey (Nepal), Qingxin Liu (China), Enkeleda Pjetri (Albania)
WFI Staff: Shadia Duery / International Fellowship Manager, Dona Ye / Intern from China

Where does Portland's drinking water come from? 
It comes from two sources: the Bull Run Watershed (BRW) as main source, and as back up a set of water wells located in the Columbia South Well Field.

In 1882 BRW, located about 20 miles from downtown Portland, was designated Portland's drinking water source. BRW and its buffer zone are closed to the public and in 2001 were put under federal protection. BRW water is filtered by the watershed. The only chemicals added to the water are Chlorine, to kill any potential bacteria, and Ammonia, to prevent Chlorine to evaporate while being transported to the faucets.